Need a Letter?


HAVING ACADEMIC DIFFICULTIES?

NEED A LETTER[1]?  
 

The Student Counseling Service (SCS) does not make recommendations to course instructors, academic advisors, or academic deans to excuse absences, allow make-up tests, grant incomplete grades, or to change an academic requirement or to take academic action.

If you have received services from the SCS and would like your counselor to write a letter to your course instructor, academic advisor or academic dean, please note that your counselor may write a letter to

  • Confirm your attendance of counseling sessions or participation in the SCS programs.   
  • Provide a brief summary of your presenting concerns and the progress you made in counseling.

Your counselor may also provide a professional opinion regarding how your individual concerns might impact your academic performance. Your counselor will determine the appropriateness of providing such opinions after he/she is able to work with you for a period of time and a proper assessment has been conducted.

All SCS services are confidential.  You will need to sign an authorization to permit the release of information before your counselor can write a letter to another party revealing that you received SCS services.  Information that your counselor provides to the recipient of a letter is no longer protected by the confidentiality of the SCS and may become part of your educational record.  FERPA[2] states that certain individuals may access your educational record, such as a school official who has a legitimate educational interest; this record may also be accessed in the event of a “health and safety” emergencyAdditionally, parents of students who are claimed as dependents on the federal income tax form may be able to access a student’s educational record.  Only the specific information for which you provide authorization is released.  All other information remains protected under the confidentiality laws of the State of Texas.  
 

Please consult your counselor if you need a letter.

 


[1] Approved 10/3/2012
[2] Federal Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974